3 Professional Baseball Players Experiences with Tommy John Surgery

The incidence of Tommy John surgery in baseball players continues to be on the rise throughout amateur and professional baseball.  At this point it’s unfortunate that many feel it is just “part of the game.”

There are many myths about Tommy John surgery and the procedure is even thought to have guaranteed success.  Some even believe that Tommy John surgery will enhance their performance and increase their velocity.

The mainstream media tends to focus on the success stories, however, it’s a long process of surgery and rehabilitation.  

I recently sat down with 3 professional baseball pitchers on an episode of the Ask Mike Reinold Podcast to hear their stories about their elbow injury, surgery, and rehabilitation follow Tommy John.  Tim Collins, Dennis Torres, and Jamill Moquette do an amazing job sharing their experiences.  This is great insight to learn straight from the pros and a must watch for every baseball player, parent, and coach.

 

3 Professional Baseball Players Experiences with Tommy John Surgery

 

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Mike Reinold

Website at MikeReinold.com
Mike Reinold, DPT, SCS, CSCS, is a world renowned physical therapist and performance enhancement specialist and the former Head Athletic Trainer and Physical Therapist of the Boston Red Sox. He is currently the owner of MikeReinold.com and Champion PT and Performance just outside Boston, MA.
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4 replies
  1. Abby Gordon
    Abby Gordon says:

    Awesome video, Mike and crew! I think it’s important to note how many of these kids are getting rehabbed by PTs around the country, like myself, who aren’t baseball specialists and who don’t have the extensive toolbox of rehab exercises and manual techniques that you use… which can certainly influence the athletes’ outcomes. I thoroughly enjoyed seeing some of Lenny’s techniques in the background as you discussed. Thanks!

    Reply
  2. Michael
    Michael says:

    Have an 8th grade pitcher right now that sits in the classic “young baseball mentality” of today. Play, play, play. Multiple seasons, multiple teams, group baseball lessons, private pitching lessons are what constitute 365 days of this kid’s sport participation. Baseball year round and to make matters even worse… during the examination I asked, “what other positions do you play?” His response was quick and stern, “I don’t!” After chuckling I asked him again. His response was firm yet again, “I only pitch.” I proceeded to tell him that if he wanted to pitch for years to come he better learn another position. He and his father scolded me about this comment telling me that he is the best pitcher on the team and there was no reason to focus on another position. Kid has bicipital pain that is only present during pitching. Pain at NO OTHER TIME and non reproducible in examination. I pointed out signficant scapular dysfunction/instability in addition to RTC weakness and yet again encouraged him to throttle the pitching and enjoy the sport from multiple positions. I looked his dad straight in the eye and said, “this is an overuse injury, clear as day.” They came to me through a PCP and have already informed me that they want an ortho surgeon’s opinion. Sadly, I know overuse has not resonated with the kid nor the parent. Hope I can break through to save this kid’s arm.

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    • Mike Reinold
      Mike Reinold says:

      Tough one. I actually go through a long educational process during my exam. How/why injuries occur and what to do about it. Packed with science and research. I also tell them I consult with MLB teams about who to draft, and I would flag him as someone to not draft! Hard to argue with me after that :) haha. Tell them you talked to a friend that said that. That being said, some kids/parents are certainly “lost” in the system like this. Not much you can do but continue to educate and support. Remember, they hired you to help them continue, not tell them to stop. But have to educate. Oh yeah, and his “biceps” pain is probably from his growth plate… Send him to ortho to rule it out and they’ll shut him down for 6 months. Problem solved.

      Reply

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